Iver Johnson Arms

Post WWII Commercially Manufactured M1 Carbines (U.S.A.)

Iver Johnson Arms

Middlesex, NJ
Jacksonville, AR
Hardwick, VT









 



Section ISection IISection IIISection IVSection VSection VI
History
of
Iver Johnson Arms
1977-2012
Models Serial Numbers
&
Dates of Manufacture
Receivers
&
Markings
Parts Brochures, Price Lists,
Fliers & Manuals

(Downloads)

Section IV

Receivers & Markings

Reconstructing what was done with markings has been a bit of a challenge due to:

At the same time the variations in markings along with the serial numbers allows for estimating their dates of manufacture and what was done when.

Markings used on the commemorative models and 9mm Parabellum model are shown on the pages devoted to those models.

As additional photographs are acquired this page will expand to include more information regarding the entire receiver with each markings and if photographs of better quality are obtained they will be used to replace what is depicted here. This is an ongoing research project.

Iver Johnson's Arms
Middlesex, NJ
1978-1979

Military Model
Paratrooper Model
      Super Enforcer
Models
      5.7mm Johnson
Models
      Stainless Steel
M1 Carbine
IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS
CAL. 30                         M-1
MIDDLESEX,  NEW JERSEY

      IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS
CAL. 30                         PP-1
MIDDLESEX,  NEW JERSEY

      IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS
CAL. 5.7MM             M-5
MIDDLESEX,  NEW JERSEY

      IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS
30 CAL                 S.S. M1
MIDDLESEX   NEW JERSEY


Note the vertical casting mold mark. This mold mark is consistent with those manufactured under the name of Plainfield Machine Co.


Iver Johnson's Arms
Middlesex, NJ
1980-1983

During this sequence all models have the same markings on top of the receiver. The serial number two letter prefix designated the type of carbine.


The front of the lug is reinforced for strength. This began with Plainfield Machine carbines in the early 1960's and
continued throughout production for Iver Johnson Arms, AMAC, and eventually Federal Ordnance, IAI, and Auto-Ordnance.
Refer to the section on parts for how this affected stocks.


Note the change in casting mold mark from the prior carbines.

The casting mold mark for this series of carbines is worth note. It is consistent with receivers manufactured by Ecrimesa in Santander, Spain. Iver Johnson receivers with this mold were limited to Middlesex, NJ 1980-1983. Surplus Iver Johnson receivers with this casting mold mark were used by Federal Ordnance for their carbines 1981-1987 and initially by Israel Arms International in 1996 until they contracted Ecrimesa to manufacturer receivers.

In this author's opinion, Iver Johnson carbines made with this receiver are amongst the best carbines made under the name of Iver Johnson's Arms. Some may be critical of receivers cast in Spain but these particular receivers are equal to, or slightly better than, those made prior. The country a receiver is cast in or who it is cast by is not as important as the standards to which that foundry is held by the company who they made the receiver for, and the standards to which that same company set for the product they produced.

Iver Johnson's Arms
Jacksonville, AR
1983

Some of the first carbines sold by Iver Johnson's Arms in Jacksonville, AR were built using surplus receivers acquired from Middlesex, NJ.
These receivers retained the markings and serial numbers of the final production in Middlesex, NJ. Jacksonville added the letter A at
the end of the serial number to denote the carbine was built and sold in Arkansas.


Iver Johnson's Arms
Jacksonville, AR
1983

These markings were used on the first carbines manufactured in Jacksonville, AR and appear to have been used on less than 500 carbines. Some of the receivers with these markings have serial numbers farther along in the serial number sequence as opposed to being only one small block. This may indicate receivers with different markings were sometimes mixed together while awaiting serial numbers and construction into carbines. This also occurred with a few receivers left over from Middlesex, NJ that retained their NJ markings.

IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS
30 CAL                         M-1
JACKSONVILLE,        AR.


Iver Johnson's Arms
Jacksonville, AR
1984-1985

IVER JOHNSON
Jacksonville, AR.
CAL. 30 M1

Serial numbers continued to be located on the left side of the receiver at the front, parallel to the breach.


Iver Johnson's Arms
Jacksonville, AR
1985-1986

These receivers were left over from Middlesex, NJ but had yet to be finished and serial numbered. They are serial numbered with the sequence used by Iver Johnson's Arms in Jacksonville during this time period and have the Iver Johnson Jacksonville, AR name and logo added to the left side of the receiver below the rear sight.


Iver Johnson's Arms
Jacksonville, AR
1985-1986

With the influx of thousands of receivers from the acquisition of Universal Firearms, Iver Johnson acquired both finished Universal receivers and receivers in various stages of being completed. The markings observed on the receiver ring of the Iver Johnson carbines in this sequence were Universal Firearms markings used 1966-1967 (serial numbers 88000-127000). Universal changed their receiver design in 1967 starting with s/n 100,000. Universal receivers manufactured prior to s/n 100,000 were to GI dimensions and interchangeable with Iver Johnson receivers. With only a few exceptions, those s/n 100,000 and above were specific to Universal's carbines and incompatible with all others.

The receivers below were leftovers from the Universal Firearms serial number sequence 92,000 - 99,999 that had been in various stages of completion.

The receivers manufactured by Universal Firearms were machined from a forged steel billet instead of casting. Universal was the only commercial carbine manufacturer to use a wide recoil plate tang on the rear of the receivers. Some of the carbines with these markings have the wide tang, some were machined to a narrow tang as used by Iver Johnson. These are forged steel receivers machined to GI receiver dimensions. They do not have the reinforced trigger housing lug as used by Iver Johnson.


Squared trigger housing lug of Universal Firearms forged steel receivers.


Wide Recoil Plate Tang used by Universal Firearms
The tang on the rear of some of the Iver Johnson carbines in this sequence has been machined down to the narrow tang.

These were the last receivers/carbines manufactured by Iver Johnson's Arms prior to Chapter 11 Bankruptcy in October 1986. Universal and Iver Johnson carbines manufactured in the months preceding this bankruptcy sometimes have a mixture of one another's parts and markings.

AMAC
Jacksonville, AR
1987-1990

With the re-acquisition of Iver Johnson's Arms by Louis Imperato in 1987 came a name change. Iver Johnson became a division of American Military Arms Corporation (AMAC). The AMAC name/logo replaced the previous Iver Johnson name and logo on the left side of the receiver.


AMAC
Jacksonville, AR
1991-1992

With the introduction of the Stars and Stripes Commemorative's in January 1991 the AMAC name/logo was eliminated and the Iver Johnson name was added to the top of the receiver above the breach. Most of the carbines with these markings were commemorative carbines. Some were M1 Carbines with commemorative carbine slides, some were the standard model Iver Johnson M1 Carbine.


Note the thick trigger housing lug on the bottom of the receiver at the front. This receiver was never finish machined after casting.


Vertical casting mold mark

Iver Johnson
Warwick, VT
2006-2007

The new Iver Johnson of Warwick, VT is not known to have manufactured and/or any complete M1 Carbines. Surplus receivers have been purchased with some being assembled into full carbines by owners. These receivers are believed to have been manufactured with the intent of building carbines but the project was discontinued before production commenced and the receivers being sold as surplus.


The markings in the receiver ring were part of the casting. Compare the markings above with those
on the receiver ring of the Iver Johnson carbines of New Jersey 1980-1983.


The reinforced lug consistent throughout Iver Johnson production


The casting mold marks to the right of the recoil plate lug have been machined flat.
Those that remain are consistent with the receivers used by Iver Johnson's Arms New Jersey 1980-1983.

Iver Johnson of Warwick, VT appears to have acquired these receivers from surplus leftovers of a prior carbine manufacturer. The casting mold marks are consistent with the receivers manufactured by Ecrimesa in Santander, Spain and used by Iver Johnson Arms of NJ 1980-1983 (2nd set of markings), Federal Ordnance 1981-1986 (all), and Israel Arms International 1995-2000 (first half of production). The latter two companies acquired at least some of their receivers from surplus left over after Iver Johnson moved their operations from New Jersey to Arkansas, where the new owners acquired and used a different mold.